China’s transition

Outstanding article on China from Stratfor.  The image that many have of China’s economic growth and political freedom are at odds with the facts.  This article does a great job of showing where things have been, where they are now, and where they may be going.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China’s transition

China is looking increasingly desperate

Paper was first invented in China. So was paper money, and thus runaway inflation. It is interesting to see China return to its historical roots this week with the significant devaluation of its currency, the renminbi.  

China’s actions make it look desperate. The Chinese economy is slowing down, perhaps more rapidly than the communist party in China would like. They have tried spurring stock market growth, and then propping up the stock market to prevent it from falling. Now, they are devaluing the currency to try to get the economy jump-started.

Real economic growth comes from productivity, not from printing currency, redistributing wealth, spurring stock market speculation, or punishing those profiting from stocks falling. All of China’s, or Europe’s, or America’s, or Japan’s attempts to get growth from someplace other than productivity (which isn’t in the government’s wheelhouse) are doomed to failure.

Devaluing the renminbi is an attempt to make Chinese goods cheaper for foreigners to buy. That “works” as long as no other country decides to devalue their currency, too. And, it assumes that market participants are too stupid to adjust prices based on currency manipulation, which history and academic research has been shown not to be the case.

It should come as little surprise that communist dictators misunderstand how a free market works. China is running the risk of not only disrupting the world economy with its actions, but also definitely proving to Chinese people that they don’t know what they are doing. The risks and the results are real, and will be felt worldwide.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China is looking increasingly desperate

China and Greece: sound and fury signifying nothing?

Just a couple of weeks ago, you couldn’t look at the news without seeing dire predictions about Greece leaving the European Union or China’s stock market tanking. Now, it seems like these perils have passed and there’s nothing to worry about. That’s unlikely the case.

I’m an optimist by nature, and I tend to think things will work out in the long run. That does not, however, make me a Pollyanna. I don’t think that problems in Greece or China are the end of the world. But, I also think it’s naive to think that such issues were insubstantial and likely to fade with so little hardship.

Greece still can’t pay back its loans, and they are still demonstrating little desire to reform. European lenders still want their loans repaid, and seem unlikely to grant Greece forgiveness for large amounts of debt. In other words, the situation hasn’t really changed, and therefore still requires careful observation.

China’s stock market did not tank because of some bizarre conspiracy. Like all markets that have been artificially pumped up, it must necessarily deflate. Any attempts to defy that natural process are doomed to fail one way or the other. The underlying issue of China’s economy slowing down has not changed. The political and economic consequences are non-trivial and demand watching.

Markets have a natural ebb and flow, just like nature. And, just like nature, those ebbs and flows are largely unpredictable over the short term. That doesn’t mean you can’t see broader themes evolving. It was easy to see that the tech bubble of the late 1990’s would pop, but impossible to predict when. It was easy to see that the housing market of the mid 2000’s would burst, but impossible to predict precisely when.

Greece and China have real problems that will eventually reverberate throughout the global economy. I don’t know precisely when these issues will loom large, but I do know they haven’t been resolved. This is not a good time to ignore those risks.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China and Greece: sound and fury signifying nothing?

China: more important than Greece

While most of the world was overly focused on Greece, bigger things were afoot in China.

First, the Chinese economy is the 2nd largest in the world. What happens in China matters for the world economy. In contrast, Greece’s economy is but 2% of the European economy. Although Greece’s problems are likely to become broader problems in Portugal, Spain, Italy and France, by itself Greece doesn’t have a big impact on the world economy.

Second, China’s economy is still essentially run by a communist central planning authority. They are giving some free market principles a try, but they have maintained a firm grip on the most important things. How they react to the inevitable ups and downs any economy faces is important for understanding how the world economy will do in coming years and decades.

Over the last year, the Chinese government has been showing they aren’t ready for prime time. First, they have reacted to economic slowing–inevitable in any economic system, whether capitalistic, communistic, socialistic, etc.–with attempts to prop things up. As usual, such attempts look good in the short term but fail over time. Governments just aren’t any good at allocating capital.

Second, they are misreading market reactions and have basically lost their cool. After trying to use free markets to boost their economy, they are now trying to prevent markets from clearing by forcing large stockholders to hold instead of selling. There is nothing that spooks markets more than a government’s attempts to force the outcome they want instead of the natural equilibrium that would otherwise exist.

This a classic reversal of cause and effect. Stock markets, like all markets, react to news by adjusting prices to make supply and demand match at market clearing prices. Any attempt to prevent that mechanism from operating in the short term leads to disastrous effects in the long run. Markets are effects, not causes, contrary to how many politicians and historians like to interpret the facts.

The more the Chinese government continues to overreact and try controlling outcomes, the more world markets will overreact as a result. Such impacts will be much worse than letting markets find equilibrium. Just witness commodity price swings in reaction to Chinese intervention and you can get a flavor for how nasty things can get. 

I think what is going on in China should be watched much more closely than what is happening in Greece. The stakes and consequences are much greater.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China: more important than Greece

China: how will its mass urbanization impact the global economy

China’s impact on the global economy is hard to overstate.

Not only is it the world’s second largest economy (by country, not region), but also the source of a huge amount of incremental growth over the last 15 years.

I’ve seen estimates that over 50% of the demand for iron ore and copper comes from China. Almost 50% of worldwide steel is produced in China. I once read that China has used as much concrete in 2011 and 2012 as the U.S. used in the 20th century! I don’t know if such estimates are specifically accurate, but their magnitude gives you a flavor of how China has impacted the global economy. In short, the economic crisis since 2008 would have looked a lot worse without China.

Given that, it’s important to consider the impact of China on future economic growth. 

One of the dynamics going on in China is the move from a more production-based to a consumption-based economy. China is approximately 34% consumer-based versus 70% in the U.S. China has built an economy, predominantly from the top down, that has mostly produced goods for other countries, like the U.S., Europe and Japan. But that source of growth was limited. You can only take market share for so long before you need to become your own source of growth.

China is trying to make that transition, but getting a command and control economy to do that without large disruptions is very difficult. 

One aspect of such a transition is having hundreds of millions of Chinese farmers move from the hinterland to cities. In cities, they can work in factories and produce much more than they can on the farm. That higher productivity leads to higher consumption, thus achieving China’s goals. 

But, how do you move hundreds of millions of people from farm to city. In the west, and Japan, that transition took place over many decades, and mostly organically (by organically, I mean through free market forces, not through government fiat). Those transitions led to disruptions, just as it will in China.

China, however, is trying to do this much more quickly and on a much more massive scale. China wants to move around 235 million people to cities over the next 20 years. For perspective, that’s the size of the 10 largest cities in the world now (from Tokyo at 37 million to Mexico City at 20 million). Can you even imagine trying to regrow 10 of the largest cities in the world, over the next 20 years? (for more information, read Stratfor’s article on the subject)

Achieving such a task is Herculean, and it will impact the global economy.

How? I don’t know. It could all happen smoothly, which I consider unlikely. It could occur with either international or domestic war, as such pressures have created throughout history. It could happen in fits and starts with massive swings in economic growth from boom to bust. No one knows, really, but it bears watching.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China: how will its mass urbanization impact the global economy

China syndrome

Some people think China will grow strongly forevermore.  That would lead to significant changes in both the political and economic landscape going forward.

Others think China will run into a brick wall because governments are terrible capital allocators.  That, too, would lead to significant changes on the political and economic front.

In other words, China will have a large impact on the future of politics and economics no matter what.  You can’t think about the short, intermediate or long term without some attention to China.

With that in mind, I highly recommend a recent piece from GMO (a very good investment firm) regarding China.  

It points out the same problems highlighted in a book called Red Capitalism: that China’s growth is built on a shaky and corrupt financial system.  

I hold the opinion that China is headed for trouble, although I have no idea when that trouble will come about (just like I saw the dot-com bubble and the housing/credit bubble coming, but couldn’t predict when each would pop).  

China’s trouble could be long term stagnation like Japan experienced over the last 20 years, or economic collapse like Europe and the U.S. experienced in 2008-2009, or outright revolution.  I really don’t know.

But, I do know it’s important to think about ahead of time.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China syndrome

China article

Despite its all-too-common use of the ridiculous term, “state capitalism,” this article outstandingly spells out the case for China to experience an economic crisis in the next 5-10 years: Time Magazine, Why China Will Have an Economic Crisis.  

China can and might change course, but it’s current path is one we’ve seen before and will end in tears.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

China article