Unsurprising drop

The stock market was down 2.5% on its first trading day of June. This follows a decline of 6.8% in May, leaving stocks down 10.2% since its high of April this year, and down 18.9% since the high of October 2007. This seems to have surprised, and even shocked, many investors.

When asked what the stock market would do, J.P. Morgan famously said, “It will fluctuate.” Benjamin Graham told investors (in his book The Intelligent Investor) to resign themselves in advance “to the probability rather than the mere possibility that most of his holdings will advance, say, 50% or more from their low point and decline the equivalent of one-third or more from their high point at various periods.”

In other words, the stock market is a roller coaster, and investors should anticipate and even expect frequent stomach-churning drops and thrilling climbs along the way. These drops are not a sign of something unusual and dreaded, but something expected and even eagerly anticipated. Why? Because drops lead to opportunity as merchandise that cost $100 a few days ago is now on sale for less (sometimes, much less).

As I pointed out in my posts, Better than zero and “Where’s the market going next year?”, the math underlying expected future returns should have warned investors to anticipate drops. And, as I expressed in my post, All eyes on China, news of slowing growth from China would likely lead markets lower, and it has.

I think investors were surprised because they don’t think of the stock market as a roller coaster, or they try too hard to relish the climbs and forget the inevitable drops. Perhaps they also suffer from myopia, attending to recent company reports and economic news instead of thinking about longer term data. 

Nevertheless, drops will happen, and they should be exploited instead of feared. Lower prices mean higher future returns–clearly a good thing. Panicky investors that sell as the market drops benefit longer term investors that buy from them. I’m not saying the drops won’t pull at your stomach–they will. What I’m saying is drops are to be expected and wise investors will have the courage to act as the market drops to exploit short-term oriented investors.

I’m not panicking as my portfolio drops, but lining up my buy list and making purchases as the market sinks. The more it sinks, the more I’ll buy. Just like riding a roller coaster, I look forward to the plunges and climbs, because that’s the nature of the beast.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

Unsurprising drop

What a roller coaster ride!

Boy have the markets been exciting lately!

After reaching a new intraday high of 14,121.04 on July 19th, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has plunged to an intraday low of 13,041.77 (a negative 7.6% return) on August 1st, and then hit an intraday high of 13,769.63 today (up 5.6%). That’s quite a round trip in 20 days!

In the same time, bond yields, too, have plunged and then recovered to some degree. All this volume and price movement must be making some traders and brokers happy…

What does it all mean? I’m not going to act like I know, but I do know that market moves like this represent opportunity.

Sure enough, I took the opportunity to purchase a Real Estate Investment Trust for my income clients on August 1st. It was yielding almost 10% at that point and its price has already recovered 9.6% since I bought.

I don’t see this as a chance to brag, because I know very well its price could plunge before I have a chance to publish this post. What I do want to highlight is the golden opportunity found in market volatility.

While some people panic, cooler heads find opportunities. It’s not my area of specialty, but I guarantee you that some distressed debt gurus are out there picking up securities on the cheap that will pay them handsomely over time.

Market volatility equals market opportunity. Instead of panicking, go shopping instead.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.

Continued ripple effects

It’s been interesting to watch how the fallout in credit markets has rippled across other markets.

The initial indication of credit market stress showed up as subprime problems during late winter and early spring of this year. At the time, many market commentators were saying it was isolated and contained.

Then, as expected, credit tightening continued to ripple across other markets as it became more difficult to raise high yield debt. This, too, was described as a short term and isolated situation.

Now, it sounds like prime home equity loans are having trouble as are auto loans. The ripples keep showing up in more and more places. And, the market commentators continue to declare that it’s contained and short term.

Is this unusual? Not at all. This is exactly the type of thing that happens every time credit markets get too loose. As the credit market gets further and further away from its most recent problems, lower quality borrowers are loaned more and more money, or money is lent to borrowers at a rates not high enough to compensate for the risk involved.

At some point in time (forecasting if it will happen is easy, forecasting when is extraordinarily difficult), credit markets tighten again as lenders realize they have made bad loans.

This usually takes several years to unfold and almost always includes a large and “unexpected” crisis such as Long Term Capital Management in 1998, the Saving and Loan Crisis in the late 80’s and early 90’s, or the corporate credit squeeze in 2002.

I expect greater difficulties for banks (especially mortgage banks) that made bad loans, bond insurers that insured AAA tranches that were much more risky than they assumed, and mortgage insurers who looked only at recent data when pricing their insurance premiums.

At a later point in time, the market will become so disgusted that great buying opportunities will occur. I don’t think that time is here, yet, but I also assume that smart investors will start buying long before the bottom is reached. I just may be in that group, too.

Nothing in this blog should be considered investment, financial, tax, or legal advice. The opinions, estimates and projections contained herein are subject to change without notice. Information throughout this blog has been obtained from sources believed to be accurate and reliable, but such accuracy cannot be guaranteed.